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Dahlin, J. (2007). Nociception and antinociception in the speke’s hingeback tortoise (kinixys spekii): Involvement of cholinergic mechanisms. Unpublished thesis , The Department of Neuroscience, Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden The Department of Animal Physiology and Anatomy, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya. 
Added by: Sarina Wunderlich (06 Jul 2014 16:10:38 UTC)
Resource type: Thesis/Dissertation
BibTeX citation key: anon2007s
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Categories: General
Keywords: Cuora trifasciata, Geoemydidae, Physiologie - physiology, Schildkröten - turtles + tortoises, Verhalten - ethology
Creators: Dahlin
Publisher: The Department of Neuroscience, Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden The Department of Animal Physiology and Anatomy, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya
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Abstract     
Testudinidae Kinixys spekii Tortoises are widely used as domestic animals and therefore their pain mechanisms have to be understood. They are also interesting to study from a comparative biology point of view. In the present study, a method called the suspended formalin test – a variant of the normal formalin test – has been developed to study the pain in these animals. This method makes it possible to understand the pain response and to test different analgesic drugs in tortoises. In contrary to the formalin test in other animals, the study suggests that tortoises do not show differentiable acute and inflammatory pain phases. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist oxotremorine is shown to have an analgesic effect in doses of 200 μg/(kg bw) and 100 μg/(kg bw) on tortoises, and the higher dose in combination with the antagonist atropine 2.5 mg/(kg bw) increases the pain threshold even further. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist epibatidine did not affect the pain threshold in the doses studied, though it has an effect on the activity of the animal. The epibatidine also induces salivation, suggesting that it affects the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In summary, the pain mechanisms in tortoises are different from mammals, and therefore the tortoises have to be treated with customized analgesic drugs when pain is imminent.
Added by: Sarina Wunderlich  
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