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Bagatto, B., Guyer, C., Hauge, B., & Henry, R. P. (1997). Bimodal respiration in two species of central american turtles. Copeia, 1997(4), 834–839. 
Added by: Sarina Wunderlich (28 Feb 2010 12:07:01 UTC)
Resource type: Journal Article
BibTeX citation key: Bagatto1997
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Categories: General
Keywords: Kinosternidae, Kinosternon, Kinosternon leucostomum, Physiologie = physiology, Schildkröten = turtles + tortoises, Staurotypus, Staurotypus triporcatus
Creators: Bagatto, Guyer, Hauge, Henry
Collection: Copeia
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Abstract     
Diving and ventilatory behavior were observed in two species of bimodally breathing turtles, the giant Mexican musk turtle (Staurotypus triporcatus) and the white-lipped mud turtle (Kinosternon leucostomum). Respiratory gas exchange in both air and water was also measured in unrestrained individuals of each species. Despite large differences in cutaneous surface area, both species exhibited an aquatic $\overset \circ \to{{\rm V}}{\rm o}_{2}$ and $\overset \circ \to{{\rm V}}{\rm co}_{2}$ of approximately 8% and 41%, respectively, with the remainder explained by aerial gas exchange. However, these similar results were produced by markedly different ventilatory behaviors. Although musk turtles utilized more bouts of breathing per emersion period, mud turtles took more breaths per breathing bout, significantly more breaths per emersion period, and had significantly longer dives than musk turtles. Emersion apnea and emersion duration times were consistently longer in musk turtles although these differences were not significant. Cutaneous surface area is therefore only one factor in determining the degree to which turtle species have adapted to aquatic respiration; other factors, such as behavioral, ecological, and life-history strategies, must also be considered.
Added by: Sarina Wunderlich  
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